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Jewish Museum London goes global with Google Art Project

Passover cushion, 18th century, used to enable the celebrant to carry out the commandment to eat the Passover meal reclining. This depicts the High Priest with the paschal lamb, with the city of Jerusalem in the background.

Date: 10 April 2012

The Jewish Museum London is one of only two Jewish museums internationally and one of only twelve collections in the UK to be selected for inclusion as a partner in the ground-breaking Google Art Project.

Google has launched a major global expansion of its innovative Art Project, including partnerships with 151 partners in 40 different countries, ranging from Australia and Argentina to India, Korea and Japan. As a result of this expansion, more than 30,000 objects are available to explore and view on Google Art in high resolution. Some have been photographed in extraordinary detail using super high resolution or ‘gigapixel’ photo-capturing technology, enabling the viewer to study details of brushwork and patina beyond that possible with the naked eye.

The Jewish Museum London and the Jewish Museum in New York are both partners in the Google Art Project, which also includes the Israel Museum. Within the UK, other partners include the National Gallery, Tate Modern and Tate Britain, the Victoria and Albert Museum, Imperial War Museum and National Galleries of Scotland.

Abigail Morris, Chief Executive commented We are thrilled to be chosen to be part of the very prestigious Google Art Project. The objects displayed from our collections both link specifically with the Jewish community but also have a universality that will appeal to millions all over the world. We are very excited to be given this opportunity to share our objects and we hope they are enjoyed by many.

Museum Director Rickie Burman said People all round the globe can now explore 150 objects from the collections of the Jewish Museum London, using the Google Art facility to zoom in on details of works of art from Hanukah lamps to wedding rings and historical items such as the London Jewish Bakers’ Union banner. The Jewish Museum’s inclusion in Google Art reflects the beauty and significance of our collections, which have been awarded Designated status in recognition of their outstanding international and national importance.

The Jewish Museum’s collections can be explored www.googleartproject.com/collection/the-jewish-museum-london.

A catalogue with 15,000 items from the Jewish Museum’s collections can also be viewed online on its website www.jewishmuseum.org.uk together with two new virtual exhibitions, Yiddish Theatre in London and Jewish Britain: A History in 50 Objects.

Notes to Editors

The Jewish Museum London

Image credit: Passover cushion, 18th century, used to enable the celebrant to carry out the commandment to eat the Passover meal reclining. This depicts the High Priest with the paschal lamb, with the city of Jerusalem in the background.

For more information and examples of images, please contact Rickie Burman on Rickie.Burman@jewishmuseum.org.uk tel. 020 7284 7380 or Janice Lopatkin on Janice.Lopatkin@jewishmuseum.org.uk tel. 020 7284 7365

The Jewish Museum, Raymond Burton House, 129-131 Albert Street, Camden Town, London NW1 7NB

www.jewishmuseum.org.uk

Background

The Jewish Museum reopened in 2010 after a £10 million transformation creating a landmark museum that celebrates Jewish life and cultural diversity. Its new displays and exhibitions tell the story of Jewish history, culture and religion in an innovative and compelling way and engage with people of all backgrounds and faiths to explore Jewish heritage and identity as part of the wider story of Britain. The only museum in London dedicated to a minority community, the museum’s expansion and redevelopment was made possible following a £5m grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Displayed across four permanent galleries, the huge variety of objects, films, photography, hands-on exhibits and personal stories on display paint a rich and nuanced picture of British Jewish life and religion as well as exploring contemporary social issues around immigration and settlement. The new museum also houses a Changing Exhibitions Gallery, a 100-seat auditorium, an Education Space, and a café and shop.

Google Art Project

Key features of the new Google Art Project:

Users may browse the content by the artist’s name, the artwork, the type of art, the museum, the country, the city and the collection. Google+ and video hangouts are integrated on the site, allowing viewers to create even more engaging personal galleries. A specially designed Street View ‘trolley’ took 360 degree images of the interior of selected galleries which were then stitched together, enabling smooth navigation of over hundreds of rooms within the museums. The gallery interiors can also be explored directly from within Street View in Google Maps. More than 30,000 artworks are featured in high resolution. Some have been photographed in extraordinary detail using super high resolution or ‘gigapixel’ photo capturing technology, enabling the viewer to study details of the brushwork and patina beyond that possible with the naked eye.
An enhanced My Gallery feature allows users to select any of the 30,000 artworks - along with their favorite details - and ‘build their own personalised gallery. Comments can be added to each painting and the whole collection can then be shared with friends and family. It’s an ideal tool for students. The new Art Project includes other completely new tools called Explore and Discover. Users can find artworks by period, artist or type of artwork, displaying works from different museums around the world.

Nelson Mattos, VP Engineering, Google:

Google is committed to bringing all types of culture online and making it accessible. The Art Project demonstrates how the Internet helps spread knowledge.

Amit Sood, Head of Art Project, Google:

The Art Project is going global, thanks to our new partners from around the entire world. It’s no longer just about the Indian student wanting to visit Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. It is now also about the American student wanting to visit the National Gallery of Modern Art in Delhi.

The Art Project illustrates Google’s commitment to bringing culture online and making it accessible the widest possible audience. Under the auspices of the Cultural Institute, Google is producing high resolution images of the Dead Sea Scrolls, digitizing the archives of famous figures such as Nelson Mandela, and creating 3D models of 18th century French cities.

Find out more about the Google Art Project on Google’s new YouTube channel, and explore the project at www.googleartproject.com

Tuesday 10th April, 2012

Press & filming

If you are interested in writing an article or using an image to promote the Museum, or wish to film in the Museum, please contact Janice Lopatkin on
+44 (0)20 7284 7365 or janice.lopatkin@jewishmuseum.org.uk

 

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