rss en Content Curator <![CDATA[Curator's Talk: Blood]]> 15/02/2016 – Discover more about the Blood exhibition with its curator]]> 15/02/2016 : Discover more about the Blood exhibition with its curator



Discover more about the themes, stories and objects in the Blood exhibition with exhibition curator Joanne Rosenthal.

Blood draws together manuscripts, prints, Jewish ritual and ceremonial objects, art, film, literature and cultural ephemera to present a rich exploration of how blood can unite and divide, reflecting on over 2,000 years of history.

This talk is also being given on:

Book now: admin@jewishmuseum.org.uk / 020 7284 7384

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09/10/2015]]>
<![CDATA[Witness the Witness: Gerta Vrbova]]> 21/02/2016 – Hear Holocaust Survivor Gerta Vrbova talk about her experiences]]> 21/02/2016 : Hear Holocaust Survivor Gerta Vrbova talk about her experiences



On the 7 April 1944 an unprecedented heroic act was accomplished by two Auschwitz prisoners from Slovakia, Walter Rosenberg (Rudi Vrba) and Alfred Wetzler (Josef Lanik). At a great risk to themselves and those prisoners who helped them, these two young men succeeded to escape from Auschwitz, walked 130km in enemy territory and reach Zilina in Slovakia.

There they contacted the Jewish Council and revealed to the world the horrendous truth about Auschwitz. Their extensive report about the death camp now known as the Vrba-Wetzler protocols was considered to be one of the most important pieces of documentary evidence presented at the Nuremberg Trials of 1945.

Over 70 years later Rudi Vrba’s first wife, Gerta, will talk about the events, their shared history and the initiatives to ensure Rudi’s legacy and achievements will be remembered.

Gerta Vrbova lived through the Holocaust as an adolescent girl in Nazi- occupied Slovakia and Hungary. Her lust for life, inborn gifts to adapt to special situations and react decisively, enabled her to survive.

After the war Gerta Studied medicine at Charles University in Prague in communist Czechoslovakia. She married Rudolf Vrba and they had two children. In 1958 she escaped from Czechoslovakia with her two children and came to England.

She worked as a neuroscientist in various British Universities and became well known for her imaginative work. She lives in North London and her children and grandchildren live nearby.

There will be an opportunity for reflection and questions.

Gerta Vrbova’s talk is suitable for families but the recommended age for children is 13 and above due to the sensitive nature of the topic.

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01/02/2016]]>
<![CDATA[Curator's Talk: Blood]]> 22/02/2016 – Discover more about the Blood exhibition with its curator]]> 22/02/2016 : Discover more about the Blood exhibition with its curator



Discover more about the themes, stories and objects in the Blood exhibition with exhibition curator Joanne Rosenthal.

_Blood _draws together manuscripts, prints, Jewish ritual and ceremonial objects, art, film, literature and cultural ephemera to present a rich exploration of how blood can unite and divide, reflecting on over 2,000 years of history.

This talk is also being given on:

Book now: admin@jewishmuseum.org.uk / 020 7284 7384

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03/02/2016]]>
<![CDATA[Walking Tour - Bagels to Brady Street]]> 06/03/2016 – Explore the east of Brick Lane with Blue Badge guide Rachel Kolsky]]> 06/03/2016 : Explore the east of Brick Lane with Blue Badge guide Rachel Kolsky



Explore the east of Brick Lane with Blue Badge guide Rachel Kolsky. With the wonderful aroma of bagels, the sights and sounds of the street markets and designer stores, you can really feel the memories of the Jewish community flood back with synagogues, the maternity home and Hughes Mansions whose residents were almost entirely Jewish when tragedy struck in 1945. This tour ends with a real treat, a visit to the closed cemetery of Brady Street.

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24/11/2015]]>
<![CDATA[Circumcision: An Index of Difference and/or the Health Exception]]> 08/03/2016 – A talk by Professor Sander Gilman at Birkbeck, University of London]]> 08/03/2016 : A talk by Professor Sander Gilman at Birkbeck, University of London



Venue: Birkbeck University of London, Bloomsbury, London, WC1E 7HX. Room B33, Torrington Square main entrance

Ritual practice defines religion, not least the ancient practice of infant male circumcision undertaken by Jews and others.

Among western societies, the United States is the nation in which infant male circumcision is most widely accepted and practiced. Here 55 per cent of infant male children have their foreskins surgically removed before leaving hospital, but for “health” rather than for “religious” reasons. In Europe, by contrast, only 10 per cent of boys are circumcised.

In this lecture Professor Gilman asks what happens when religion and medicine compete or are allied; what happens when these two aspects of the public sphere overlap? In what contexts does circumcision occur as a health practice or as a risk? What are the implications of health-related circumcision for religious practice?

Sander L. Gilman is Professor of the Liberal Arts and Sciences as well as Professor of Psychiatry at Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia. A distinguished cultural and literary historian, he is the author or editor of over eighty books, most recently, Illness and Image: Case Studies in the Medical Humanities (Transaction Publishers, 2015); and the edited volume, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam: Collaboration and Conflict in the Age of Diaspora (Hong Kong University Press, 2014)

Book now

This lecture is one of a series being held alongside the Blood exhibition (5 November 2015 – 28 February 2016), which was conceived in collaboration with the Pears Institute for the study of Antisemitism.

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04/02/2016]]>
<![CDATA[Mindfulness at the Museum: A Secular Sabbath]]> 12/03/2016 – Over two Saturdays we will we introduce mindfulness through interacting with objects from the Jewish Museum.]]> 12/03/2016 : Over two Saturdays we will we introduce mindfulness through interacting with objects from the Jewish Museum.



What is worth remembering? The words Sabbath and mindfulness have similar meanings; to remember.

Over two Saturdays we will we introduce mindfulness through interacting with objects from the museum, led by former Buddhist monk Amaranatho.

Just as the museum creates a space to explore heritage, identity and culture from a Jewish perspective, we will explore what they mean personally and collectively through our shared stories.

This is not a course in Judaism or just mindfulness it is a journey into centre of who we are and how we relate to one another. This course will give you an opportunity to create community and reflect on life as well as developing presence, non judgmental awareness and a heart of peace.

Book Your Place

Session 1: The Heart of the Museum
Date: Saturday 12 March 2016
Time: 10.30am – 4.30pm

The word Sabbath means to rest; what do you rest in? During this first session we will introduce what mindfulness is and explore it practically by connecting to the objects in the museum.

By opening our eyes to what we see, we can develop attention and clarity.

The ability to rest with life’s difficulties be they in the mind or externally is based on attention and clarity. Mindfulness is a tool that is scientifically researched to improve attention and clarity. By doing this the heart can have more joy, abundance, kindness and ultimately freedom.


Session 2: The Museum of Freedom
Date: Saturday 19 March
Time: 10.30am - 4.30pm 

Would you like to know what freedom is? Current scientific research on Mindfulness is about becoming a better person, the art of mindfulness is about deeply inquiring into who we are.

During our time together we will again explore the museum to see what we are looking at and what are looking from. It will take us on a inner journey to the core of who we are; giving us a opportunity to see for yourself a freedom not based on artefacts.  (This workshop is particular usefully if you are experienced meditators and stuck in your practise.)

The sessions are open to anyone regardless of faith or belief.

About Amaranatho

Amaranatho was brought in the Jewish tradition and struggled to find the happiness he was looking for as young man.

Soon after his Barmitzvah he left Judaism to find happiness and truth, he spent many years in search of this. This included working as a technical support manger for a computer company,  working hard to get a degree in Artificial Intelligence and being a world explorer.

Through meditation he encountered Buddhism and soon became a Monk, which he did for 15 years. This brought him back to Judaism where he has spoken at JW3, Limmund, runs Jewish Buddhist retreats and speaks on Buddhism at Leo Beck Rabbinical college and mentors trainee Rabbis. Amaranatho disrobed in April 2015.

What he shares is based on cutting edge science, ancient wisdom and creative multi-media. He is interested in the interpersonal aspect of mindfulness and how we can use our daily interaction with people to develop emotional resilience, kindness and peace. He has run over a hundred retreats and worked with 1000’s of people.

Book Your Place

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21/12/2015]]>
<![CDATA[Mindfulness at the Museum: A Secular Sabbath]]> 19/03/2016 – Over two Saturdays we will we introduce mindfulness through interacting with objects from the Jewish Museum.]]> 19/03/2016 : Over two Saturdays we will we introduce mindfulness through interacting with objects from the Jewish Museum.



What is worth remembering? The words Sabbath and mindfulness have similar meanings; to remember.

Over two Saturdays we will we introduce mindfulness through interacting with objects from the museum, led by former Buddhist monk Amaranatho.

Just as the museum creates a space to explore heritage, identity and culture from a Jewish perspective, we will explore what they mean personally and collectively through our shared stories.

This is not a course in Judaism or just mindfulness it is a journey into centre of who we are and how we relate to one another. This course will give you an opportunity to create community and reflect on life as well as developing presence, non judgmental awareness and a heart of peace.

Book Your Place

Session 1: The Heart of the Museum
Date: Saturday 12 March 2016
Time: 10.30am – 4.30pm

The word Sabbath means to rest; what do you rest in? During this first session we will introduce what mindfulness is and explore it practically by connecting to the objects in the museum.

By opening our eyes to what we see, we can develop attention and clarity.

The ability to rest with life’s difficulties be they in the mind or externally is based on attention and clarity. Mindfulness is a tool that is scientifically researched to improve attention and clarity. By doing this the heart can have more joy, abundance, kindness and ultimately freedom.

Session 2: The Museum of Freedom
Date: Saturday 19 March
Time: 10.30am - 4.30pm

Would you like to know what freedom is? Current scientific research on Mindfulness is about becoming a better person, the art of mindfulness is about deeply inquiring into who we are.

During our time together we will again explore the museum to see what we are looking at and what are looking from. It will take us on a inner journey to the core of who we are; giving us a opportunity to see for yourself a freedom not based on artefacts.  (This workshop is particular usefully if you are experienced meditators and stuck in your practise.)

The sessions are open to anyone regardless of faith or belief. 

About Amaranatho

Amaranatho was brought in the Jewish tradition and struggled to find the happiness he was looking for as young man.

Soon after his Barmitzvah he left Judaism to find happiness and truth, he spent many years in search of this. This included working as a technical support manger for a computer company,  working hard to get a degree in Artificial Intelligence and being a world explorer.

Through meditation he encountered Buddhism and soon became a Monk, which he did for 15 years. This brought him back to Judaism where he has spoken at JW3, Limmund, runs Jewish Buddhist retreats and speaks on Buddhism at Leo Beck Rabbinical college and mentors trainee Rabbis. Amaranatho disrobed in April 2015.

What he shares is based on cutting edge science, ancient wisdom and creative multi-media. He is interested in the interpersonal aspect of mindfulness and how we can use our daily interaction with people to develop emotional resilience, kindness and peace. He has run over a hundred retreats and worked with 1000’s of people.

Book Your Place

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21/12/2015]]>
<![CDATA[Witness the Witness: Joan Salter]]> 20/03/2016 – Holocaust survivor Joan Salter talks about her experiences]]> 20/03/2016 : Holocaust survivor Joan Salter talks about her experiences



Hear Holocaust survivor Joan Salter talk about her experiences and answer audience questions.

Joan Salter (née Fanny Zimetbaum) was born in Brussels in February 1940 to Polish Jewish parents. Her father was arrested by the Nazis and the rest of the family tried to escape to France, then Vichy and finally over the mountains into Spain.

From there Joan was taken into care of the Quakers and the Red Cross and was finally evacuated to the USA as an unaccompanied child. She changed her name from Fanny to Joan and settled into American life, learning to speak English.

It took until 1947 before Joan was reunited with her parents and they settled in England. Joan struggled with her identity and rebuilding her relationship with her parents was fraught with difficulty. Carefully reconstructing her past she has been able to piece together her early years’ memories and come to terms with her difficult history.

Joan has visited Poland in a quest to find out more about her father’s Polish town, Tarnow and now attends a ceremony each year to commemorate the once flourishing Jewish community there.

Joan has written many books and articles and is featured in Edward Stourton’s book ‘Cruel Crossings’. Joan's story is also included in WE REMEMBER by The Child Survivors Association of Great Britain. Joan Salter regularly speaks to school groups getting her message. across of tolerance understanding and the importance of identity.

Recommended for ages 11+

Box office: admin@jewishmuseum.org.uk / 020 7284 7384

Image courtesy of Holocaust Memorial Day Trust

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19/01/2016]]>
<![CDATA[Remembrance Event: Keep the Home Fires Burning]]> 20/03/2016 – Wind & Words of World War I with Chris Hooker and Valerie Fry]]> 20/03/2016 : Wind & Words of World War I with Chris Hooker and Valerie Fry



Join us for an afternoon recital of clarinet music and World War I poetry, with Chris Hooker and Valerie Fry.

This year our Jewish Military Museum and Association of Jewish Ex-Servicemen and Women (AJEX) Remembrance event will feature ‘Wind and Words’, clarinet music, poetry and words from the First World War.

The programme will include music from Jewish composers and poets such as Rosenberg and Sassoon. Also from our collections, excerpts from the letters of Marcus Segal, a north London Jewish soldier who died aged 20 in 1917.

Book now admin@jewishmuseum.org.uk / 020 7284 7384

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10/11/2015]]>
<![CDATA[Teachers' Evening: How to make the most from our online resources]]> 22/03/2016 – Free session with our Learning Team]]> 22/03/2016 : Free session with our Learning Team



Looking for new and innovative ways to engage your students back in the classroom?

Join us at the museum for a hands-on workshop using our Objects in Focus: Teachers’ Resources website. Designed especially for teachers and students our website includes high resolution images of items in our collection chosen by the Learning Team to help introduce the topics of Judaism, Holocaust and immigration history to your students.

Using the images, video and audio on the website your students can engage with the content either together as a class or individually as a homework assignment. Content is regularly designed and uploaded for Key Stages 1–5. 

Included in this evening is the chance to visit the new temporary exhibition focusing on Menswear and Fashion. This exciting exhibition will take the visitor on a journey through the changing male image of a 100 year period.

 
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22/10/2015]]>
<![CDATA[Cecil Roth Lecture - Living with Others: Jews and Other Minorities in England since the Seventeenth Century]]> 07/04/2016 – With Professor David Feldman (Birkeck)]]> 07/04/2016 : With Professor David Feldman (Birkeck)



In 1656, despite considerable controversy and opposition, Oliver Cromwell allowed Jews to come to England and live here openly. In this lecture Professor David Feldman traces how, from this beginning, we reached our current diverse, troubled, multicultural society and how Jews have figured in this in this story.

David Feldman is Director of the Pears Institute for the study of Antisemitism. He is a Professor of History at Birkbeck and has written on the history of Jews in Britain, as well as on the history of immigrants, ethnic minorities and migrants, from the 17th century to the present day.

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27/01/2016]]>
<![CDATA[Walking Tour - Theology to Theatre, Morals to Music at Hoop Lane Jewish Cemetery]]> 10/04/2016 – With Blue Badge guide Rachel Kolsky]]> 10/04/2016 : With Blue Badge guide Rachel Kolsky



This ever popular guided tour highlights the history of the Hoop Lane cemeteries. Opened in 1897 for both the Reform and Sephardi communities there is an array of fascinating personalities for whom this is their final resting place.

They include those of religious leaders such as Hugo Gryn and Albert Friedlander, actor Sydney Tafler, philanthropist and youth leader Sir Basil Henriques, writer Jack Rosenthal, the parents of Maurice and Charles Saatchi and agony aunt, Marjorie Proops.

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24/11/2015]]>
<![CDATA[Curator's Talk: Moses, Mods and Mr Fish]]> 11/04/2016 – Hear from the curator of our menswear exhibition]]> 11/04/2016 : Hear from the curator of our menswear exhibition



Discover more about the themes, stories and objects in Moses, Mods and Mr Fish: The Menswear Revolution with exhibition curator Elizabeth Selby.

Moses, Mods and Mr Fish tells the story of the men’s fashion and the emergence of the modern male wardrobe, taking the visitor on a journey from the tailoring workshops of the mid-19th century to the boutique revolution and mod culture of the Swinging ‘60s.

This talk is also being given at 2pm on:

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14/01/2016]]>
<![CDATA[Witness the Witness: Zahava Kohn]]> 17/04/2016 – Holocaust survivor Zahava Kohn talks about her experiences]]> 17/04/2016 : Holocaust survivor Zahava Kohn talks about her experiences



Hear Holocaust survivor Zahava Kohn talk about her experiences and answer audience questions.

Zahava Kohn was born in British-controlled Palestine in 1935 but moved to Amsterdam with her parents when she was two years old. Her brother Yehudi was born after the Netherlands was occupied by Germany. The family desperately tried to get visas to countries outside of the Nazi occupied territories, and took many bold and brave decisions to ensure their children were safe.

One such decision was to hand Zahava's baby brother to the Dutch resistance, believing this to be his greatest chance of survival. Zahava and her parents were eventually deported to Bergen Belsen and endured years of unimaginable hardship.

Through a series of incredible events, the family were released and eventually reunited after the war. Zahava, will talk about how her family came to terms with the awful atrocities they had endured and how they subsequently managed to establish a warm and close knit family unit.

After Zahava’s mother's death, she discovered a suitcase full of documents, drawings and letters her mother had collected during the tumultuous war years - at huge risk to herself and her family. This treasure trove of evidence, artifacts and memories formed the beginning of both Zahava and her daughter's journey to find out more about this part of their family history and then tell the story to the general public. It is published in the book ‘Fragments of a Lost Childhood’.

Zahava will be in conversation with her daughter Hephzibah, who has made it her mission to ensure the story is told and the lessons around survival, tolerance and hope remain resonant and relevant for the next generation. By going into schools, they seek to give students a chance to ask questions and develop their personal connections with this terrible time in recent history

Suitable for ages 13+

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19/01/2016]]>
<![CDATA[Curator's Talk: Moses, Mods and Mr Fish]]> 09/05/2016 – Hear from the curator of our menswear exhibition]]> 09/05/2016 : Hear from the curator of our menswear exhibition



Discover more about the themes, stories and objects in Moses, Mods and Mr Fish: The Menswear Revolution with exhibition curator Elizabeth Selby.

Moses, Mods and Mr Fish tells the story of the men’s fashion and the emergence of the modern male wardrobe, taking the visitor on a journey from the tailoring workshops of the mid-19th century to the boutique revolution and mod culture of the Swinging ‘60s.

This talk is also being given at 2pm on:

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14/01/2016]]>
<![CDATA[Walking Tour - Stitch Stitch Stitch]]> 15/05/2016 – With Blue Badge Guide Rachel Kolsky]]> 15/05/2016 : With Blue Badge Guide Rachel Kolsky



Blue Badge Guide Rachel Kolsky's tour linked to our new exhibition Moses, Mods and Mr Fish: The Menswear Revolution explores the background to the ever-changing rag trade of Spitalfields.

Once the centre of London's silk and sweated tailoring industries dominated by the French and Jewish immigrants, the same streets today are a centre for African textile shops, vibrant markets, designer makers and cutting edge fashion.

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24/11/2015]]>
<![CDATA[Curator's Talk: Moses, Mods and Mr Fish]]> 13/06/2016 – Hear from the curator of our menswear exhibition]]> 13/06/2016 : Hear from the curator of our menswear exhibition



Discover more about the themes, stories and objects in Moses, Mods and Mr Fish: The Menswear Revolution with exhibition curator Elizabeth Selby.

Moses, Mods and Mr Fish tells the story of the men’s fashion and the emergence of the modern male wardrobe, taking the visitor on a journey from the tailoring workshops of the mid-19th century to the boutique revolution and mod culture of the Swinging ‘60s.

This talk is also being given at 2pm on:

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14/01/2016]]>
<![CDATA[Walking tour - Stamford Hill]]> 17/07/2016 – With Blue Badge guide Rachel Kolsky]]> 17/07/2016 : With Blue Badge guide Rachel Kolsky



Explore north Hackney's 'square mile of piety'. From its early days as a wealthy neighbourhood in the 1800s, Stamford Hill has since become multi-cultural but is known predominately for its ultra-orthodox Jewish community.

Discover the background to the various synagogues, schools and shops - past and present, and find out the difference between Bobover and Lubavitch, Kedassia and Beth Din and taste an authentic rugelach.

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24/11/2015]]>
<![CDATA[Walking Tour - Jewish Hampstead]]> 10/08/2016 – Mittel Europe in NW3: with exclusive visit to Belsize Square Synagogue]]> 10/08/2016 : Mittel Europe in NW3: with exclusive visit to Belsize Square Synagogue



This gentle stroll among the leafy streets of Swiss Cottage uncovers many and varied 20th century Jewish connections.

From the German/Austrian emigres of the 1930s including Freud and his family to the Hampstead members of Bnai Brith's First Lodge and the Primrose Club, this tour also includes an exclusive visit to Belsize Square Synagogue to hear its very special history.

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24/11/2015]]>
<![CDATA[Walking Tour - Clapton]]> 11/09/2016 – Back by popular demand!]]> 11/09/2016 : Back by popular demand!



Explore the delights of Clapton including the childhoods of Harold Pinter, Lords Levy and Sugar and Helen Shapiro, the memories of Lea Bridge Road synagogue and the close-knit Clapton Jewish community, neighbourhood Springfield Park, the stylish young Marc Feld and the current fast growing ultra-orthodox community.

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24/11/2015]]>
<![CDATA[Walking Tour - Jewish City: a walk of Jewish firsts]]> 06/11/2016 – With Blue Badge guide Rachel Kolsky]]> 06/11/2016 : With Blue Badge guide Rachel Kolsky



Set against the backdrop of the City of London we highlight the stories of Jewish Firsts, many of whom broke down the barriers of discrimination in Victorian England. We feature not only the first synagogues and the first Jewish MP but also a Lord Mayor, a Prime Minister and a Baronet.

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24/11/2015]]>